Curriculum

Illinois' CNSS IA Certifications

The Information Assurance Courseware Evaluation (IACE) Review Committee certified that University of Illinois courseware maps 100% to the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) National Training Standards 4011 (for Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, NSTISSI-4011) and 4013A (for System Administrators (SA), CNSSI-4013 Advanced Level). The IACE Program provides consistency in training and education for the information assurance skills that are critical to our nation.

Degree Programs

Degrees related to information assurance can be pursued in the departments of Computer Science and Electrical & Computer Engineering. Further information is available on the departmental websites:

Illinois Courses in Information Assurance and Cyber Defense

200- and 300-level courses are for undergraduates; 400-level courses can be taken by either undergraduate or graduate students; 500-level courses are for graduate students.

Click through the links for information on current and recent offerings of each course.

Illinois Technical Courses Related to IA/CD

  • CS 241 (System Programming): introduces threat, access controls, and vulnerabilities.
  • CS 411 (Database Systems): focuses on the design, implementation, and optimization of query languages; security and integrity; concurrency control, and distributed systems.
  • CS 412 (Introduction to Data Mining): focuses on the design and implementation of data warehouse and online analytical processing (OLAP).
  • CS 423 (Operating Systems Design): introduces protection, encryption, threat, policy, and coding practices.
  • CS 425/ECE 428 (Distributed Systems): covers credentials and encryption/decryption algorithms.
  • CS 427 (Software Engineering I): introduces planning and good coding practices.
  • CS 428 (Software Engineering II): introduces access controls, secure protocols, and secure code.
  • CS 438/ECE 438 (Communication Networks): covers signatures, encryption/decryption, and protocols.
  • CS 460/ECE 419 (Security Laboratory): covers access controls, secure protocols, and policies.
  • CS 461/ECE 422 (Computer Security I): covers ethics, privacy, notions of threat, vulnerabilities and risk in systems, information warfare, malicious software, data secrecy and integrity issues, network security, and trusted computing, among other topics.
  • CS 463/ECE 424 (Computer Security II): covers program security, trusted base, privacy, anonymity, non-interference, information flow, confinement, advanced auditing, forensics, intrusion detection, key management and distribution, policy composition and analysis, formal approaches to specification and verification of secure systems and protocols, and topics in applied cryptography.
  • CS 498 AL1 (Digital Forensics I and Digital Forensics II): Two-semester sequence focuses on acquisition and investigation of evidence from all devices capable of storing digital data related to the prosecution of cyber crime and fraud. (Click through to information on currently available CS 498 sections.)
  • CS 498 AM1 & AM3, and ECE AC3 & AC4 (Applied Cryptography): introduces concepts of modern cryptography, including a combination of theoretical foundations and practical techniques. (Click through to information on currently available CS 498 sections.)
  • CS 498 CD (Cyber Dystopia): focuses on the downsides of technical progress, including prediction of the future and steps that might avoid the most undesirable outcomes. (Click through to information on currently available CS 498 sections.)
  • CS 498 SM (Principles of Safe Autonomy): introduces key algorithms and techniques for building powerful autonomous systems. (Click through to information on currently available CS 498 sections.)
  • CS 511 (Advanced Data Management): addresses concepts in data management and information system design and implementation, and recent developments in the field.
  • CS 512 (Data Mining Principles): addresses data cleaning and integration; descriptive and predictive mining, mining frequent, sequential, and structured patterns; clustering, outlier analysis and fraud detection; stream data, web, text, and biomedical data mining; security and privacy in data mining.
  • CS 523 (Advanced Operating Systems): addresses non-repudiation, authentication, delegation, and confidentiality.
  • CS 563/ECE 524 (Advanced Computer Security): addresses current research trends in computer and network security.
  • CS 591 RHC (Security Reading Seminar)(Click through to information on currently available CS 591 sections.)
  • CS 598 AB (Computer Security in the Physical World): examines recent work in security that influences a wide variety of physical world phenomena. (Click through to information on currently available CS 598 sections.)
  • CS/ECE 598 AM (Cryptocurrency Security): introduces students to current research in cryptocurrencies; includes hands-on practice with cryptocurrency tools. (Click through to information on currently available CS 598 sections.)
  • CS 598 BL (Adversarial Machine Learning): surveys vulnerabilities in machine learning algorithms and algorithmic techniques that yield more robust learning. (Click through to information on currently available CS 598 sections.)
  • CS 598 CLF (Secure Processor Design): examines the interplay among hardware, software, and applied cryptography in secure processor architectures. (Click through to information on currently available CS 598 sections.)
  • CS 598 MAN (Applied Cryptography): provides theoretically sound foundation in applied cryptography to see fundamental crypographic notions and how crytographic primitives can be used to create applications with security guarantees. (Click through to information on currently available CS 598 sections.)
  • ECE 398 SC (Smart Contracts & Blockchain Security): teaches students how to use cryptographic tools to design secure smart contract applications, and to find & prevent vulnerabilities. (Click through to information on currently available ECE 398 sections.)
  • ECE 498 KL (eCrime & Internet Serv Abuse): covers the techniques profit-motivated miscreants use to compromise and abuse computer systems. (Click through to information on currently available ECE 498 sections.)
  • ECE 598 NB (Privacy Enhancing Technologies): reviews foundational and recent research results in the field of privacy-enhancing technologies. (Click through to information on currently available ECE 598 sections.)

Illinois Non-technical Courses Related to IA/CD